Best Times to Go to China

There are a number of best times to go to China depending on your answers to these questions:

  • Where in China do you want to go?
  • What do you want to do?
  • Do you like it hot or cold, or somewhere in between, or are you not bothered?
  • Do you like it wet or dry, or are you not bothered?
  • Do you want to take advantage of low season discounts?
  • Do you want to see one of China’s festivals or seasonal attractions?
  • Do you want to avoid tourist crowds and crowded transportation?

The Most Popular Times to Go to China

1. October

Autumn Colors on the Yellow Mountains

The No. 1 time to go to China is early autumn (October). It is best to miss the first week of October (Chinese National Day Holiday) when attractions, transport, and hotels are packed with Chinese tourists and prices go up considerably.

In October the weather is optimal: most of China has warm/mild temperatures, and the summer rains have stopped (apart from around Hong Kong and Sanya) so it’s relatively dry. The major Chinese attractions in Beijing, Xi’an, Shanghai, Guilin, Hong Kong, Chengdu, etc. are all at a comfortable time to visit.

Festivals and events include Chinese National Day (October 1 – a good time to see patriotic entertainment and fireworks), the Shaolin Kungfu Festival, the Canton Fair (from the 15th), Qiang Minority New Year (Jiuzhaigou), and in about 15% of years the Mid-Autumn Festival. In late October you could also see fall foliage vistas. However, it is the high season, so tour prices are highest.

2. Late Spring – Late April/ Early May

The No. 2 time to go to China is probably late spring when flowers are in bloom, and temperatures are warming up, but not yet too hot. The Labor Day holiday week (May 1 – 7) should be avoided as attractions, transport, and hotels are packed with Chinese tourists and prices go up considerably.

In late spring temperatures are optimal with all of China getting into the 20s centigrade (the 70s Fahrenheit). While the North of China (Beijing, Xi’an) is still dry, the summer rains have already began in the South, though not yet at their peak, with dampness guaranteed and storms possible. This could actually enhance the view in the form of mountain mists in mountainous areas like Guilin and the Yellow Mountains.

It is a good time to see flowers blooming and there are a number of ethnic festivals. See China Spring Travel.

Jiuzhaigou Nature Park in Southwest China's Sichuan Province. September is one of the best times to visit the park.

3. September

September is probably the No. 3 time to go to China. It has many of the benefits of October, but with more heat and rain. Some still find this month a little too hot. In September you are likely to be able to experience China’s Mid-Autumn Festival (85% of years have a September Mid-Autumn), China’s second largest festival with lots of tradition and customs associated with it.

4. Summer (late May through August)

There is little to choose between China’s summer months, but the August school holiday is likely to be the busiest time. Sunshine and warmth certainly make for good holiday weather, though some might find it too hot. Most places experience temperatures over 30°C (86°F).

It is best to visit China’s remote areas (Tibet, the Northwest, Inner Mongolia, and mountainous areas) in the summer (or late spring/ early autumn) when the weather is not bitterly cold and possibly dangerous.

The Monsoon (and Typhoons)

Li River is often covered in mists during the rainy season from May to July.

The summer rains are also a factor that may affect your trip. Cruises may be halted if the Li River or the Yangtze is in flood, and any outdoor activity may be rendered less enjoyable by a downpour. The monsoon is generally greater in intensity the further southeast you go. Hong Kong has the most rainfall, and in Xi’an, near the dry northwest, the summer rains are hardly worth mentioning.

The rainiest month also changes with location in China. The monsoon comes early in Guilin, peaking in early June. In Shanghai the rains peak in late June, but with high amounts in July and August, as it is also typhoon season for the east coast. In Xi’an the rains (still only moderate) peak in July. The rains peak in late July in Beijing and are largely confined to July and August (Chengdu is similar, but with more rain). The Hong Kong monsoon peaks in August and, coupled with typhoons, gives Hong Kong very high rainfall from May through to September. In tropical Sanya the rains peak in September and continue for longest, from May to October, but only about half the quantity of Hong Kong’s.

5. Early Spring (late March and Early April)

This time is favored for visiting North China over late autumn as it is warmer and rainfall isn’t really a factor. However, in southern China spring can be uncomfortably damp. This is the time for seeing spring flowers in North China; flowers often come earlier in the warmer south. See China Spring Travel. It is the low season so travel is cheaper.

6. November (late autumn)

November is the best time to see fall colors across China. See China in Fall. For travelling to the south of China late autumn is better than early spring as it is drier, and there are still some warm days. It is also the low season so you can travel cheaper.

A huge ice sculpture displayed during the Harin Ice Festival. The yearly festival has become one of the highlights of winter activities in China.

7. Winter (December to early March)

Apart from if you love winter weather or winter sports there is not much to draw you to China in winter, apart from the cheapest low season prices and lack of tourist crowds. Generally the best times to visit China’s top attractions are in line with the above ranking, with the exception of winter attractions like Harbin’s Ice and Snow Festival and China’s ski resorts.

Winter is bitterly cold in North China, and gloomy and cold in the South, though if the wind changes direction there can be some warm spells. The exceptions are Hainan Island and its beach resorts like Sanya, and other places that just fall within the tropics like Hong Kong, Macau, Shenzhen, etc., which enjoy mild winters. Kunming, the Spring City, maintains mild weather all year round, so Yunnan’s capital and the tropical rainforest of southernmost Yunnan could be comfortably visited.

Chinese New Year

The exception to winter low season quietness and cheapness is Chinese New Year, when the Chinese transport network is stressed to the limit and hotel prices go up by two or three times. Chinese New Year celebrations last for about 2 weeks in the period from late January to early March, and train tickets may be sold out up to 10 days before. If you don’t mind the extra cost and crowding this is the time to see China at its most traditional, relaxed, and festive.

Seasonal Attractions

China has many attractions with a special time of year when people generally visit them. Several are linked above, but these deserved a special mention.

  • Harbin
    The most obvious seasonal attraction must be Harbin with its Ice and Snow Festival in January and February. See the amazing ice sculptures before they melt!
  • Tibet
    Tibet is only a recommended destination for about half the year (May to September). Outside these months temperatures can drop below freezing at night and daytime temperatures rarely get above 20°C (68°F).
  • Naadam Festival is usually held during July or August in Inner Mongolia.

    The Silk Road
    Like Tibet, China’s remote Northwest is better seen in the warmer months, as the deserts and mountain corridor are bleak in the winter.
  • Inner Mongolia
    Inner Mongolia also falls into the category of warm season attractions, when the grasslands and flowers can be seen in all their beauty. In winter there is not much life to see and its very cold.

Chinese Festivals and Events

China also has many festivals and events that could be the highlight and focus of a China trip, for example Chinese New Year (late January or February), or the Dragon Boat Festival (late May or June), or the many ethnic minority festivals.

China’s Tourist Seasons

Tourist seasons are usually defined as follows:
High seasons: April 1 to May 31, and September 1 to November 15.
Shoulder season (not quite as high as the high seasons): June 1 to August 31.
Low season: November 16 to March 31.

Air Fares

Domestic air fares are affected by China’s tourist seasons (above). The peak price period for international airfares, late July and August, coincides with the school summer holidays (northern hemisphere). The low price period for air fares, November to February, corresponds with winter. It could almost be said that the warmer the weather is the more expensive the air fare.

Hotel Prices

Hotel Prices generally follows the tourist seasons above, with the highest prices in the high season, medium prices in the shoulder season and lowest prices in the low season. However, hotel prices are more strongly influenced by China’s three big national holidays than anything else: Chinese New Year (late January or February), Labor Day (May 1 – 7) and National Day (October 1 – 7), when prices can be two or three times the norm.

Attraction Prices

The cost to enter some of China’s attractions will also vary with the tourist season. This is particularly true for cruises of the Li River and Yangtze cruises.

Further Reading

Hi, I'm Gavin Van Hinsbergh
I updated this article on February 10, 2014
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Questions and Answers About Best Times to Go to China

Eileen 2013-12-04
Show Answer
Will there still be ice sculpture @ harbin if travel in early march?
The ice sculpture usually end are later feburary or early March according to the weather. If you are lucky enough, you may still see ice sculpture when you are there. Simon Huang replied on 2013-12-04
Eileen 2013-12-04
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is this feasible? chengdu-xian-harbin-inner mongolia 10-12days
Dear Eil, It is OK to visit Chengdu, Xian and Harbin in winter time. However, the best time to visit Inner Mongolia is the summer time (May to September). If your tour dates are available during that time,we glad to tailor-made a private tour covering these cities for you. Nancy Nancy Deng replied on 2013-12-04
Martin Ordody 2013-10-09
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I would like to plan a tour for 2 in the autumn 2015, china3 -4 weeks, possibly one week in addition to bhutan??
Dear Martin, Thank you for your inquiry. You asked a tour for the autumn of 2015, do you mean in the year of 2014? The price for 2015 haven't come out yet: ) We are specialized in China tour, and I would love to recommend some great places for autumn. And it's a pity that we are unable to provide a tour to Bhutan. In order to provide an itinerary that best fits your needs, would you please answer some questions so that we can put together an itinerary that gives you what you want at the best possible price? 1. Number of people in your group including yourself 2. Length of stay in China 3. City or cities of entry/exit 4. Start date of tour 5. Places or attractions that you want to visit 6. Class of Hotel: economy/Deluxe/superior 7. Estimated total budget per person. Looking forward to hear from you! Doris doris@chinahighlights.net Doris Huang replied on 2013-10-12
winnie Ng siew kuan 2013-09-25
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I am planning a trip to hangzhou in end Dec, i am afraid that the weather is too cold/snowy to join local tour. any suggestions ? Dec & feb are the only months that me & my husband can travel.

Hi Winnie,

It is winter from December to February. Please take some coat, sweater, glove and scarf.

The average low and high temperature is respectively at 2 °C (37 °F) and 11 °C (51 °F) in December, 0 °C (33 °F) and 7 °C (46 °F) in January, and 2 °C (35 °F) and 9 °C (48 °F) in February Prepare sweater and down jacket for winter. Please see here for more details:http://www.chinahighlights.com/hangzhou/weather.htm

we can also customize Hangzhou tour for you. You can see our tour package onhttp://www.chinahighlights.com/hangzhou/tours.htm If you need my help, please contact at christyluo@chinahighlights.net

Christy Luo replied on 2013-09-26
Ryan 2013-02-18
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I''m taking my first trip to ASIA. I would like to see the best of China and Thailand. I don''t want to miss Guilin. I like modern Cities and also love nature and ancient culture. We are not into shopping so thats not our priority. We are planning our trip for April. Whats better transportation train buses or plains and how pricy they are and how its the buses. what shouldn''t I miss on my first visit to China.

We have No Force Shopping Policy that customer could skip the shops if they don't want to. I suggest that we use flight, train and bus reasonable to enable you visiting as much as possible, and also a comfortable holiday. I will send you an accurate proposal for your China trip via e-mail and you are welcome to contact me if you have any questions.

We are also providing service for booking tours in Thailand, so we are pleased to help you with it if you let us know more about your tour plan. http://www.chinahighlights.com/tour/thailand-tours/  

Delia Xie replied on 2013-02-26
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